Social Impact

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Transparency

The core of our work at Woven is to promote mindfulness in all that we do. We realize, that if we are asking you to be conscious in the way you shop, then we should set an example for others to do the same. That's why we are 100% transparent about our finances, processes, and profits. 


 

Artisans

(35%)

Woven artisans are paid 100% upfront for their creations, meaning they do not have to wait for the sale of their items to receive payment. We support non-factory working conditions and collaborate with artisans to work from home at their own pace so that they can spend time with their children and families. Artisans set the prices of their items which we then calculate shipping costs and operational costs to finalize the price that each item will sell at. 


Processes

(25%)

As a cross cultural business, we must follow legal standards to export all our items from Guatemala to the US. This process is time and cost intensive which is why roughly 25% of the price of each item is spent on exporting costs. We work with a Guatemalan exporting group called Utz Box (www.utzbox.com) to deliver our Woven pieces  safely and quickly to the US.



Woven

(20%)

Twenty percent of the price you see goes back to Woven so that we can cover operational expenses (web hosting, packaging, etc) and pay our team of three so that we can keep things running on our end. 


Profits

(20%)

100% of our profits are reinvested into our artisan development program. Our team spends several months hiring master artisans (creating more local jobs yay!)  to host workshops for less skilled artisans in our program to learn trades that they can then use as income generating opportunities. Artisans in our program are able to sell their items through Woven so that they can have consistent income. Additionally, every artisan in our program qualifies for scholarships (funded by our profits) for their children to go to school. 


Artisan Development Program & Education Scholarships

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This past summer, we met three little bundles of love and mischief on the streets of Panajachel. These three ch

ildren (Carmen, Erik, and Rosa) were selling little knickknacks on the streets daily to help their mom who sold nuts to tourists cover their expenses.

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After a few months of friendship and gaining the family's trust, we began working with Catalina, the mother to weave items for sale through Woven while her children were sponsored through the profits to go to school. Here you can meet those little rascals who are now attending school through our artisan development program.